NEM#65: Jherek Bischoff Risks Every String

Jherek started off as bassist in the late ’90s for the Seattle art rock bands The Dead Science and Parenthetical Girls, and has released about five solo albums (and other things) since 2006, the last two being full-on orchestral works.

We discuss the title track from Cistern (2016), “The Nest” featuring Mirah from Composed (2012), and “Blackstar,” featuring Anna Calvi, from a David Bowie tribute with Amanda Palmer called Strung Out in Heaven (2016). We conclude by listening to “Eyes” feat. David Byrne, also from Composed. Opening/closing music: “Automatism” from Cistern. For more info, see jherekbischoff.com.

Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us at patreon.com/nakedlyexaminedmusic.

Episode 181: Hannah Arendt on the Banality of Evil (Part Two)

Continuing on Eichmann in Jerusalem, on how ordinary people can do—or acquiesce to—horrific things. How do people rationalize this? What can we apply from this to ourselves? Also, how was genocide a new type of crime, and what’s the best rationale for punishing it? We talk justice, revenge, and ways that we too might be morally mass-confused.

Listen to part one first or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL!

End song: “Hiding from the Face of God”; hear Mark talk to singer/songwriter Jeff Heiskell on Nakedly Examined Music eps. 5 and 63.

Sponsors: Visit simplecontacts.com/pel with promo code PEL for $30 off, and Squarespace.com for a free trial and 10% off with offer code PEL.

Episode 181: Hannah Arendt on the Banality of Evil (Part One)

On Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (1963).

Are we still morally culpable if our entire society is corrupt? Arendt definitely thinks so, but has a number of criticisms of the handling of the 1961 trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann. The Israelis were committed to the view that Eichmann was a monster, when the reality, says Arendt, is more frightening.

Don’t wait for part 2! Get the ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Visit Squarespace.com for a free trial and 10% off with offer code EXAMINED.

Episode 181: Hannah Arendt on the Banality of Evil (Citizen Edition)

On Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (1963).

Are we still morally culpable if our entire society is corrupt? Arendt definitely thinks so, but has a number of criticisms of the handling of the 1961 trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann. The Israelis were committed to the view that Eichmann was a monster, when the reality, says Arendt, is more frightening.

End song: “Hiding from the Face of God” from Judybats 2000; listen to me interview singer/songwriter Jeff Heiskell on Nakedly Examined Music eps. 5 and 63.

NEM#64: Mike Huberty (Sunspot): Rock from the Other Side

Mike fronts a hard-working Madison power trio in the glam rock vein that’s put out 7 albums and 7 EPs since 2000. He also runs (and records a new song every week for) a podcast about the occult.

We discuss “Sulfur” from The Wilderness of Almost Was and Never Were (2017), “Saturday Night Gospel” from Dangerous Times (2014), and “Prozac Girl” from Loser of the Year (2003). We conclude by listening to “We Are the Darkness” from The Slingshot Effect (2011). Opening music: “Stardust (Acoustic)” from Arthuriana (2013). More: sunspotuniverse.com and othersidepodcast.com.

Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us at patreon.com/nakedlyexaminedmusic.

Episode 180: More James’s Psychology: Self and Will (Part Two)

Concluding on William James’s Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892). We briefly cover emotions and spend the bulk of our time on will. James’s introspective method allows us to distinguish reflex or coerced actions from voluntary, free-seeming ones, and gives us the vocabulary to attribute moral virtue to those who have enough willpower to keep those inconvenient truths in mind (if you eat this, you’ll get fat!) that allow us to successfully resist temptation.

Listen to part one first, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Support PEL!

End song: “Join the Zoo/Live Again” by Craig Wedren; listen to him on Nakedly Examined Music #15.

Sponsor: Learn about PDF Pen software from smilesoftware.com/podcast.

You can still get a 2018 PEL Wall Calendar!

NEM #63 Bonus: More with Bradley Skaught, Jeff Heiskell, Steve Petrinko

Another 23 minutes of catch-up talk with my ep 63 guests: Bradley works new members into the band, Jeff records a video for his new song “I Want More Life,” Steve has been doing backing instruments for his saxophone teacher (with a full song from that new project at the end of this recording), plus hear about guests I’ve been chasing around but haven’t gotten on the show yet, and more.

Episode 180: More James’s Psychology: Self and Will (Part One)

On Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892), chapters on “The Self,” “Will,” and “Emotions.”

Continuing from ep. 179, we talk about the “Me” (the part of me that I know) vs. the “I” (the part of me that knows), including personal identity. James thinks that emotions are just our experience of our own physiology. Finally, we tackle will, veering into ethics, free will, and more.

Don’t wait for part 2! Get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Make sure to pick up a 2018 PEL Wall Calendar! Visit Squarespace.com for a free trial and 10% off with offer code EXAMINED.

Episode 180: More James’s Psychology: Self and Will (Citizen Edition)

On Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892), chapters on “The Self,” “Will,” and “Emotions.”

Continuing from ep. 179, we talk about the “Me” (the part of me that I know) vs. the “I” (the part of me that knows), including personal identity. James thinks that emotions are just our experience of our own physiology. Finally, we tackle will, veering into ethics, free will, and more.

End song: “Join the Zoo/Live Again” by Craig Wedren, heard on Nakedly Examined Music #15.

NEM#63: Revisiting Bradley Skaught, Jeff Heiskell, Steve Petrinko: 2017 Year-End Extravaganza

To celebrate year #2, previous guests return: Bradley (see #32) talks “Duet” from Take Out the Poison, Jeff (see #5) presents “Still Life with Broken Heart” from Emotional Terrorism, and Steve (see #6) discusses “Wind of Change” from A Tribute to the Bee Gees ’66 to ’78. Finally, hear Tyler Hislop (see #24) about his “Wounds and Nihilism (Feat. Mark Lint).” Opening music: “Dawning on Me” by Mark Lint.

Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us at patreon.com/nakedlyexaminedmusic to hear bonus audio for this episode.

Episode 179: William James’s Introspective Psychology (Part Two)

Continuing on Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892), completing “The Stream of Thought” and covering the chapter on “Habit.”

James thinks that psychologists focus too much on those parts of consciousness that get picked out by substantive words. He describes habit as part of a general natural pattern in which things that happen once tend to create pathways for themselves in surrounding material to allow the same thing to happen again more easily. Be careful what you do, because your organism is recording all of your bad behavior and corrupting your character!

Start with part one or get the ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! Get a 2018 PEL Wall Calendar!

End song: “Drowning Mind (feedback overload)” by AMP, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #57.

Sponsors: Get up to $50 off a DNA kit at 23andme.com/pel. Visit MUBI.com/PEL for 30 days of free curated movies.

NEM#62: Anthony Phillips: Private Pieces, Soundtrack Parts, and Prog Rock

Anthony was the original guitarist and a key songwriter in Genesis from ’67–’70, released some prog rock albums in the ’70s, then shifted largely to a mix of acoustic guitar pieces and synth soundscapes, often for soundtracks.

We discuss “Nocturne” from Seventh Heaven (2012, with Andrew Skeet), “From the Jaws of Death – Touching the Face of God” from Wildlife (recorded 1999) and “Magdalen” from Sides (1979). We then listen to “Sanctuary” from Private Parts & Pieces VIII: New England (1992). Opening music: “F# Demo (The Musical Box, Instrumental)” from 1970. End music: “Mystery Train III” from Private Parts & Pieces XI: City of Dreams (2012). For more information, see anthonyphillips.co.uk.

Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us at patreon.com/nakedlyexaminedmusic.

Episode 179: William James’s Introspective Psychology (Part One)

On The Principles of Psychology (1890) chapters 1 & 7, and Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892), the chapters on “The Stream of Thought,” “Habit,” and some of “The Self.”

Can we talk about the mind in a way that is both scientific and also does justice to our everyday experiences? James thought his method, which involved both introspection and physiology, yielded more accurate descriptions of the mind than associationism (the mind is made up of ideas) or spiritualism (the mind is a faculty of the soul). Consciousness is a stream, not a concatenation of ideas!

Don’t wait for part 2! Get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL.

Make sure to pick up a 2018 PEL Wall Calendar! Get up to $50 off a DNA kit at 23andme.com/pel. Visit MUBI.com/PEL for 30 days of free curated movies, and Squarespace.com for a free trial and 10% off with offer code EXAMINED.

Episode 179: William James’s Introspective Psychology (Citizen Edition)

On The Principles of Psychology (1890) chapters 1 & 7, and Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892), the chapters on “The Stream of Thought,” “Habit,” and some of “The Self.”

Can we talk about the mind in a way that is both scientific and also does justice to our everyday experiences? James thought his method, which involved both introspection and physiology, yielded more accurate descriptions of the mind than associationism (the mind is made up of ideas) or spiritualism (the mind is a faculty of the soul). Consciousness is a stream, not a concatenation of ideas!

End song: “Drowning Mind (feedback overload)” by AMP, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #57.

Episode 178: Nietzsche as Social Critic: “Twilight of the Idols” (Part Two)

Continuing on Nietzsche’s 1888 book. Is there any ground from which we could judge life as a whole to be good or bad? Is N. more about saying “yes” to life or saying “no” to all the numerous things that piss him off? We also talk Becoming, whether producing great art is more important than being nice to everyone, and whether Nietzsche is ultimately someone we’d want to hang around.

End song: “Oblivion” by Tyler Hislop, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #24.

isten to part 1 first, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition

Make sure to pick up a 2018 PEL Wall Calendar!

Visit MUBI.com/PEL for 30 days of free curated movies, BarkBox.com/PEL for a free month with a plan.

NEM#61: Richard X. Heyman Is Incognito (Yet a Cornerstone)

Richard garnered early fame as drummer for ’60s New Jersey garage band The Doughboys and has put out 11 albums, largely as a one-man band, since 1988.

We discuss the title tracks from Incognito (2017) and Cornerstone (1998) and “Agnostic’s Prayer” from Tiers and Other Stories (2011). End song: “And Then” from Incognito. Intro: “Falling Away” from Hey Man! (1990).

Learn more at richardxheyman.com.

Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us at patreon.com/nakedlyexaminedmusic.

“Privilege” Is Not a Causal Claim

Both opponents and proponents of the use of this rhetoric make a mistake that obscures what’s really at issue. The purpose is to point out some often-ignored current disparities, historical occurrences, and facts about how people feel, not to claim that injustices are literally caused by a mechanism of privilege.

Episode 178: Nietzsche as Social Critic: “Twilight of the Idols” (Part One)

On Friedrich Nietzsche’s 1888 book summarizing his thought and critiquing the founding myths of his society. He defends “spiritualized” instinct and frenzied creativity, but also Napoleon and war. We try to figure out what kind of social critic he’d be today. Would we actually like him?

Sponsors: Get up to $50 off a DNA kit at 23andme.com/pel. Visit MUBI.com/PEL for 30 days of free curated movies, BarkBox.com/PEL for a free month with a plan, and Squarespace.com for a free trial and 10% off with offer code EXAMINED.

Episode 178: Nietzsche as Social Critic: “Twilight of the Idols” (Citizen Edition)

On Friedrich Nietzsche’s 1888 book summarizing his thought and critiquing the founding myths of his society. He defends “spiritualized” instinct and frenzied creativity, but also Napoleon and war. We try to figure out what kind of social critic he’d be today. Would we actually like him?

End song: “Oblivion” by Tyler Hislop, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #24.

Episode 177: Guest Russ Roberts on Adam Smith and Libertarian Economics (Part Two)

Continuing with the Econtalk host on the moral aspects of economics, focused by Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations and Theory of Moral Sentiments.

Should we sacrifice ourselves to the machine of the economy? How does Smith’s idea of virtue and talk of the “impartial spectator” line up with economic growth?

Listen to part 1 first or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! Learn how to install the Citizen feed on your mobile device. The 2018 Wall Calendar is now available to order!

End song: “Needle Exchange” by Fritz Beer, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #2.

Visit MUBI.com/PEL for 30 days of free curated movies. Check out The Panpsycast podcast at thepanpsycast.com.