NEM#68: Billy James (Ant-Bee): Experimenting with Idols

Billy now does press for many of his idols, but began as a drummer in music school and started Ant-Bee in the late ’80s, as a Zappa-esque improv live act and as a Beach Boys–psychedelic solo recording effort. He’s released four albums, increasingly featuring his clients.

We discuss two tracks from Electronic Church Muzik (2011): “Flutter-Bye, Butter-Flye” (feat. Michael Bruce) and “The Language of the Body” (feat. poetry by Gong’s Daevid Allen and layering on parts by Zappa alums). We then look back to two tracks from With My Favorite “Vegetables” & Other Bizarre Muzik (1994): “The Girl with the Stars in Her Hair” and a Beach Boys cover, “Do You Like Worms?” Opening/closing music: “Eating Chocolate Cake (In the Bath)” from Pure Electric Honey (1990). For more info, see ant-bee.com and glassonyonpr.com.

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NEM #55 Bonus: More Conversation and Tunes with Don Preston

After listening to Nakedly Examined Music ep. 55, feast on this conversation about whether music progresses and where it might be progressing to now, among other topics. Includes about 15 minutes of talking plus songs: “Peaches En Regalia Live” by the Grandmothers from Eating the Astoria (2000), “Inner Blues (Not a Blues)” by the Don Preston Trio from Transformation (2001), and “Loki” from Io Landscapes (2004).

NEM #55: Don Preston, Mother of Keyboard Invention

Don has composed and played jazz since the ’50s, was a Frank Zappa sideman through his classic ’60s albums and beyond, and has since released 20+ albums, scored 20 films, and has performed with numerous artists including John Lennon, Lou Rawls, and Nat King Cole. He has also been called “the father of modern synthesis” for his work in electronic music.

We discuss “Winds of Change” (3rd movement, 2001), “Palmer Park” (1975), and “Analog Heaven #7” (1975). End song: “Piano Solo” from TriAngular Bent (2016). Opening/closing music: “King Kong” from Uncle Meat by the Mothers of Invention (1969).

This conversation includes bonus conversations and songs! Get it by supporting the podcast via patreon.com/nakedlyexaminedmusic or through a podcast network membership.

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