Search Results for: "lawrence ware"

Pretty Much Pop #124: What Is Batman?

In light of the recent release of Matt Reeves' film The Batman, we consider the strange alternation of darkness and camp that is Batman. Is he even a super hero? What's with his rogues' gallery? What's with DC's anti-world-building?  Your host Mark Linsenmayer is joined by philosophy prof/NY Times entertainment writer Lawrence Ware, improv comedian/educator Anthony  Continue Reading …

Pretty Much Pop#120: Dexter the Loveable Serial Killer

Mark is joined by repeat offenders Lawrence Ware and Sarahlyn Bruck and new-to-the-podcast psych/philosophy student Michael Paskaru to talk about the Showtime TV horror-dramedy shows inspired by Jeff Lindsay's novels, in light of the revival show Dexter: New Blood. People loved this character so much that they were very mad that he didn't die at the end of the show's initial  Continue Reading …

Pretty Much Pop #119: Disgraced Artists Like Cosby

Comedian Genevieve Joy, philosopher/NY Times entertainment writer Lawrence Ware, and novelist Sarahlyn Bruck join your host Mark to discuss how we deal with entertainers like R. Kelly, Michael Jackson, Woody Allen, et al. We all watched W. Kamau Bell's Showtime documentary We Need to Talk About Cosby, so most of our discussion is around that. None of us seem able to separate  Continue Reading …

Pretty Much Pop #112: Class Critiques in Squid Game, Succession, etc.

Popular shows have commented on wealth inequality by showing how dire the situation is for the poor and/or how disconnected and clueless the rich are. How effective is this type of social commentary? Mark is joined by philosopher and NY Times writer Lawrence Ware, novelist and writing professor Sarahlyn Bruck, and educator with a rhetoric doctorate Michelle Parrinello-Cason  Continue Reading …

PREVIEW-Ep. 278: Derrick Bell on the Dynamics of Racism (Part Two)

Subscribe to get Part 2 of this episode in its entirety. Citizens can get it here. Continuing from part one on Faces At the Bottom of the Well (1992) with guest Lawrence Ware. We discuss "The Racial Preference Licensing Act" (ch. 3), which plays with an idea (attributed to his fictional alter ego Geneva Crenshaw) that since businesses continue to discriminate (in hiring if  Continue Reading …