Closereads: Aristotle Against Platonic Forms (Audio Part One), aka PEL Ep. 335 (Part Three for Supporters)

Sign up for Closereads at patreon.com/closereadsphilosophy to get future parts on this reading, as well as our previous and future installments of this new podcast. Aristotle offers a critique of Plato's theory of forms at a few points in his Metaphysics, and in this and the following part of this series, we'll be tackling this by reading part of book 1, ch. 9. Read  Continue Reading …

Closereads: Forms in Plato’s “Republic” (Part One)

Sign up for Closereads at patreon.com/closereadsphilosophy to get additional parts of this reading, as well as our previous and future installments of this new podcast. Toward the end of Book VI and into Book VII of the Republic, Plato gives a series of metaphors for the role "the good itself" plays in our knowledge and values. We read here starting at line 507b of the  Continue Reading …

PREVIEW-Ep. 264: Plato’s “Timaeus” on Cosmology (Part Two)

Subscribe to get Part 2 of this episode in its entirety. Citizens can get the second part here. Continuing from part one on the Timaeus. In this preview, we return to look closely at the beginning of the dialogue where Plato argues for differences between the perceived, created, impermanent world and its perfect model. In the full discussion, we get into time, space, and  Continue Reading …

Ep. 264: Plato’s “Timaeus” on Cosmology (Part One)

Subscribe to get Part 2 of this episode. Listen to a preview. On the later Platonic dialogue from around 360 BCE, with Mark, Wes, and Dylan. How is nature put together? Plato, speaking this time through the fictional character instead of Socrates (who is present, but only Timaeus talks after the first part of the dialogue), paints a picture of the creation of the cosmos and  Continue Reading …

Ep. 264: Plato’s “Timaeus” on Cosmology (Part One for Supporters)

On the later Platonic dialogue from around 360 BCE, with Mark, Wes, and Dylan. How is nature put together? Plato, speaking this time through the fictional character instead of Socrates (who is present, but only Timaeus talks after the first part of the dialogue), paints a picture of the creation of the cosmos and our place in it. The overall principle is the same as it was  Continue Reading …

Topic for #114: Schopenhauer on Will

On 4/8 and 4/19 we took two stabs at one of the biggie tomes of philosophical history, Arthur Schopenhauer's The World as Will and Representation, covering first metaphysics, and then aesthetics (focusing to a good degree on music). For Ep. #114, we read all of Book II (of Volume 1, which is really the book proper published in 1818, the other volumes having come out far  Continue Reading …